FAQs Food Intolerance Testing Kids

FAQs Food Intolerance Testing Kids

What are Food Intolerances or Sensitivities?

How are Food Intolerances different than allergies?

Why should my child be tested?

At what age do we start testing?

How often should my child be retested?

What causes a food allergy?

What causes a food sensitivity?

What foods most often cause food allergy?

What are the symptoms of food allergy?

What are the common symptoms of food sensitivities?

What is lactose intolerance?

What are the symptoms of lactose intolerance?

How is lactose intolerance diagnosed?

How much Calcium should children with lactose intolerance have ?

What are Food Intolerances or Sensitivities?


They are foods that impact our health that put an additional stress on the body. This stress can can impede the body’s ability to achieve it’s Optimal Genetic Potential and possibly lead to chronic disease.

How are Food Intolerances different than allergies?

Allergies follow the immunoglobulin E or G pathways causing the mast cells in the immune system to release histamine to produce traditional allergy symptoms.

The symptoms of allergies include: darkness under the eyes, sinus congestion, moodiness, hives, swelling and may be a medical emergency in anaphylaxis cases.

This is in comparison to sensitivity symptoms which tend to impact your health wherever your genetic weaknesses are so are more generalized .

Sensitivity symptoms as above may include: bloating, gas, diarrhea or constipation,  headaches, skin symptoms, pain, mood changes and decreased focus or memory to name a few.

In general the weaker the digestive system and immune system the more the number of allergies or sensitivities that are present.   Leaky Gut Syndrome may be a related underlying factor. If you have many reactions it is important to have a health restoration program which includes adrenal , digestive & immune balancing features designed for you. For a complete review it is recommended to have a new patient visit with any test methods.

Why should my child be tested?


All children should be tested to improve their energy, concentration, focus , resistance to colds/flus and overall health.
With cancer rates rising to 1 in 3 , we need to start prevention with our children.
Up to 70% of immunity is related to our bowls and this relates to all other health conditions!

At what age do we start testing?

We start from birth with nursing , colic and optimum health to teenagers.

How often should my child be retested?


We recommend retesting every 6 months until the age of 10 and then yearly thereafter.

What causes a food allergy?


Before having a food allergy reaction, a sensitive child must have been exposed to the food at least once before, or could also be sensitized through breast milk. It is the second time your child eats the food that the allergic symptoms happen. At that time, when IgE antibodies react with the food, histamines are released, which can cause your child to experience hives, asthma, itching in the mouth, trouble breathing, stomach pains, vomiting, and/or diarrhea.

What causes a food sensitivity?

Frequency, Quantity and Genetic Predisposition are the most common causes.  The more strained our bodies are the more sensitivities or allergies develop.  Underlying leaky bowl syndrome may also be related.

What foods most often cause food allergy?

Approximately 90 percent of all food allergies in children are caused by the following six foods:

  • • milk
    • eggs
    • wheat
    • soy
    • tree nuts
    • peanuts

Eggs, milk, and peanuts are the most common causes of food allergies in children, with wheat, soy, and tree nuts also included. Peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish commonly cause the most severe reactions. About 6 percent to 8 percent of children under the age of three years have food allergies. Although most children “outgrow” their allergies, allergy to peanuts and tree nuts may be life-long.

What are the symptoms of food allergy?


Allergic symptoms may begin within minutes to an hour after ingesting the food. The following are the most common symptoms of food allergy. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • • vomiting
    • diarrhea
    • cramps
    • hives
    • swelling
    • eczema
    • itching or swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth
    • itching or tightness in the throat
    • difficulty breathing
    • wheezing
    • lowered blood pressure

According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, it does not take much of the food to cause a severe reaction in highly allergic people. In fact, as little as 1/44,000 of a peanut kernel can cause an allergic reaction for severely allergic individuals.
The symptoms of food allergy may resemble other problems or medical conditions. Always consult your child’s physician for a diagnosis.

What are the common symptoms of food sensitivities?


The symptoms maybe similar to allergies. The most common symptoms are those that the infant or child is genetically predisposed to , for example frequent ear infections, strep throat, frequent cold, flus, digestive complaints, behaviour changes, mood changes, decreased energy and potentially joint pain.

What is lactose intolerance?

A Lactose intolerance is a condition caused by a lack of an enzyme called lactase. Inadequate amounts of lactase cause the body to be unable to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk products.
Lactase is normally produced in the small intestine where it breaks lactose down into a form that can be absorbed by the blood. A lack of lactase can cause uncomfortable symptoms for some people. Those who do exhibit the symptoms are said to be lactose intolerant.
Thirty to 50 million Americans (adults and children) are lactose intolerant. The disorder affects some populations more than others:

  • Eighty percent of all African-Americans and Native Americans are lactose intolerant.
    • Ninety percent to one hundred percent of Asian-Americans are lactose intolerant.
    Lactose intolerance is least common among people with a northern European heritage.

What are the symptoms of lactose intolerance?

The following are the most common symptoms for lactose intolerance. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Common symptoms, which begin about 30 minutes to two hours after consuming foods or beverages containing lactose, may include:

Digestive diseases or injuries to the small intestine can reduce the amount of enzymes produced and is the usual cause of lactose intolerance in young children. However, most cases of lactose intolerance develop over a period of many years in adolescents and adults.

  • • nausea
    • cramps
    • bloating
    • gas
    • diarrhea

The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of lactose consumed and the amount each individual can tolerate.
The symptoms of lactose intolerance may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your child’s physician for a diagnosis.

How is lactose intolerance diagnosed?


The most common diagnostic tests used to measure the absorption of lactose in the digestive system include the following:

  • • food intolerance test- at Optihealth ( link-coming soon to labs food intolerance test)
    • lactose tolerance test-This test measures the absorption of lactose in the digestive system. After fasting, the patient drinks a liquid that contains lactose. The diarrheal stools are then tested for lactose for the next 24 hours.  Undigested lactose fermented by bacteria in the colon creates lactic acid and other fatty acids, which can be detected in a stool sample, along with glucose as a result of unabsorbed lactose.
    • hydrogen breath test
    The patient drinks a lactose-heavy beverage. The breath is then analyzed at regular intervals to measure the amount of hydrogen. Undigested lactose in the colon is fermented by bacteria, resulting in the production of various gases, including hydrogen. When high levels of hydrogen are present in the breath, improper digestion of lactose is diagnosed.
    better than others. While the symptoms of lactose intolerance can be unpleasant, the condition does not damage the body. Thus, dairy foods that cause less disagreeable symptoms should be used in the diet to ensure adequate intake of calcium and other important nutrients.

How much Calcium should children with lactose intolerance have ?

Calcium is essential for the growth and repair of bones throughout life and has been suggested as a preventive measure for other diseases. Because milk and other dairy products are a major source of calcium, parents must be concerned with lactose intolerant children and teenagers getting enough calcium in a diet that includes little or no milk.
The recommended daily dietary allowance (RDA) for calcium, released in 2004 by the National Academy of Sciences, varies by age group. To note that this is the minimum quantity that a child should take in and that because a child’s diet varies a target of slightly above these amounts is most optimum.

  • • 0 to 6 months, 210 mg
    • 6 months to 1 year, 270 mg
    • 1 to 3 years, 500 mg
    • 4 to 8 years, 800 mg
    • 9 to 18 years, 1,300 mg

Many nondairy foods are high in calcium, including:

  • • green vegetables, such as broccoli and kale (Swiss chard, spinach, and rhubarb are not listed because the body cannot use their calcium content – they contain substances called oxalates, which inhibit calcium absorption)
    • fish with soft, edible bones, such as salmon and sardines
    Vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb calcium; therefore, your child’s diet should provide an adequate supply of vitamin D. Sources of vitamin D include eggs and liver. Sunlight is also a good source of vitamin D, 20 minutes exposure daily is ideal .