Men

For men a common problem  is not so much a specific disease, but that the diseases they do experience are the result of lack of health care monitoring earlier in life .(1)

The Men’s Health Network (MHN) reports that men die at higher rates than women from the top 10 causes of death – heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, accidents, pneumonia and influenza, diabetes, suicide, kidney disease, and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

According to a 2001 CDC report, women are 33% more likely than men to visit a doctor in general,  and on average, women survive men by over five years.

“Any human being who is not connected to a physician to screen for major health problems is at greater risk (of disease and death),” says Jean Bonhomme, MD, MPH, a board member of the MHN.

If you don’t get your cholesterol checked when it’s going high when you’re 20, and if don’t get your blood pressure checked when it’s going high when you’re 30, maybe your blood sugar’s getting a little high when you’re 40, what do you think is going to happen when you’re 50?

Bonhomme places part of the blame on society in general, which expects boys to be tough and ignore pain. As people get older, however, the rules change. A little pain can get worse, or signal something more serious going on in the body.

Many of the top 10 causes of death are preventable, and can be treated, if found early. For your early detection …

Tests That Your Naturopathic Doctor May Suggest Include:

References:

CDC, 2001