FAQs Allergies & Intolerances

Once I am tested for allergies or intolerances do I just need to avoid these things to feel better?

Will I always react to these items?

What are the allergy & intolerance tests  available at revIvelife™?

Which test should I choose  ?

Why should I choose to test from revIvelife™ lab?

How long after eating a food will an allergic reaction occur?

What is the difference between an allergy and a intolerance?

What are the ways to test for allergies?

What are the ways to test for intolerances?

What if my intolerance, allergy tests by allergist and or blood allergy tests show different results?

If I test negative to blood allergy testing but I have had an anaphylactic reaction to the same food before does this mean that I can eat it now?

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Once I am tested for allergies or intolerances  do I just need to avoid these things to feel better?

Working with allergies or intolerances is two teared.  One detection and two healing.

Allergy or intolerance testing is step one in your path to wellness.  Once the food or environmental reactions are determined it is important to have a health plan to understand the source of why these reactions developed and an approach to healing those mechanisms.

When one is under stress either consciously or unconsciously the body reacts by overproducing stress hormones from the sympathetic nervous system , while under producing digestive enzymes from the parasympathetic nervous system.  This leads to irritation at the bowl lining , a reduction of good bacteria and potentially many digestive concerns including leaky bowl syndrome , which amplifies many secondary health concerns including: increasing the total number of items a person is allergic or sensitive to , fibromyalgia, attention deficit, fatigue, headaches and hormone imbalances leading to increased weight.

Will I always react to these items?

When phase two is introduced as the healing portion of your plan after a new patient visit, many food or environmental reactions are reduced or eliminated.

What are the allergy & intolerance tests available at revIvelife™ lab?

Blood Allergy Test ( IgE ) Food & Environmental at reviVelife through www.gamma-dynacare.com

  • ( less than 19 items to be tested)

Blood Allergy Test/(ELISA) (IgE & IgG) reviVelife through www.meridianvalleylab.com:

Environmental Intolerances Food Intolerances Food Additive and Preservative Intolerances

Which test should I choose?

Why should I test through revIvelife™ lab ?

The advantage for allergy testing  is that you can have many items tested through one blood sample draw which give you also the most accuracy. During allergy testing via the scratch method if someone is upset ie a child alot of adrenaline is produced which may give false negative results.  The advantage for intolerance testing is your results are available immediately.

How long after eating a food will an allergic reaction occur?

Your reaction could be immediate within 3 hours of eating a food in which IgE rises in the blood OR it could be delayed which has been associated with rises inIgG, IgA, IgM and IgD.  Delayed food reactions are often associated with IgG4, a subclass of the whole IgG molecule.

What is the difference between an allergy and a  intolerance?

“Allergies” can follow two pathways either an Immunoglobulin E ( IgE) response which is an immediate reaction or an Immunoglobulin G ( IgG) response which is a delayed response. In an allergic reaction the mast cells in the immune system then release histamine to produce traditional allergy symptoms. This is compared to a “Intolerance or Sensitivity” in which the reaction doesn’t follow either pathway above creating symptoms that you are genetically predisposed to .

What are the ways to test for Allergies ?

A. BLOOD TESTS

1. Blood Ig E/Rast Test ( ND or MD Performs)

This tests for the immediate allergic response, the food reaction can occur within 3 hours after digestion.  The reaction is caused by the presence of a high IgE antibody level in the blood.  Symptoms may include : rashes after eating an apple or a headache after drinking wine.

Advantage:  Many items can be tested from one blood sample and is useful if a risk of a severe allergic reaction exists.

Disadvantages: Tests only for immediate response

2. Blood IgE & IgG/ELISA ( The revIvelife™ Blood Allergy Test Method) ( ND Performs)

This is a blood test that measures both the amount of immunoglobulin (Ig) E ( immediate response) & (Ig) G( delayed response) antibodies to a specific allergen in the blood.

Advantages:  Many items may be tested from one blood sample AND this test assesses both an immediate reaction and a delayed reaction.  This test is very useful as a general screen and when a risk of a serious reaction exists.

Disadvantages: False negative results may occur with anaphylaxis reactions thus history and combination of skin testing is recommended through an allergist if anyone has this reaction in the past or is suspected to .

3. Absolute eosinophil count ( ND or MD Performs)

An absolute eosinophil count is a blood test that measures the number of white blood cells called eosinophils. Eosinophils become active when you have certain allergic diseases, infections, and other medical conditions.

Advantages: Gives you information on the severity of the allergic or asthmatic condition

Disadvantages: Does not tell you what you are reacting to

4. Total IgE level ( ND or MD performs)

This test looks at your total immunoglobulin level E which relates to the degree of your allergy reaction.

Advantages: Gives you information on the severity of the allergic or asthmatic condition

Disadvantages: Does not tell you what you are reacting to

5. Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ( ND or MD Performs)

This test is performed to look at globulin proteins in the blood. Identifying the types of globulins can help diagnose certain disorders.

Globulins are roughly divided into three groups: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Gamma globulines include various types of antibodies such as immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A.

Advantages:  This test may help to diagnose your health condition

Disadvantages:  This test will not determine what you are reacting to

B. SKIN TESTS

1. Skin Prick/Scratch Test ( Allergist MD Performs)

This test involves placing a small amount of suspected allergy-causing substances on the skin, usually the forearm, upper arm, or the back. Then, the skin is pricked/scratched so the allergen goes under the skin’s surface. The health care provider closely watches the skin for signs of a reaction, usually swelling and redness of the site.

Advantages: Results are usually seen within 15-20 minutes.

Disadvantages:  Limited numbers of items can be tested at once and multiple sites need to be done for each allergen which can be painful.  For kids if they are nervous or upset ( ie releasing a lot of adrenaline) a false negative may result.

2. Intradermal Skin Test ( Allergist MD Performs)

A similar method involves injecting a small amount of allergen into the skin and watching for a reaction at the site.  It is more likely to be used when testing is being done to find out if you are allergy to something specific, such as bee venom or penicillin.

Advantages: Results are usually seen within 15-20 minutes.

Disadvantages:  Limited numbers of items can be tested at once and multiple sites need to be done for each allergen which can be painful.  For kids if they are nervous or upset ( ie releasing a lot of adrenaline) a false negative may result.

3. Skin Patch Testing  ( Allergist MD Performs)

Patch testing is a method to diagnose allergic reactions on the skin. Possible allergens are taped to the skin for 48 hours. The health care provider will look at the area in 24 hours, and then again 48 hours later.

Advantages:  Skin tests are most useful for diagnosing:

  • Food allergy
  • Mold, pollen, animal, and other allergies that cause allergic rhinitis and asthma
  • Penicillin allergy*
  • Venom allergy
  • Allergic contact dermatitis

Disadvantages:  A limited number of items can be tested at one time

C. ELIMINATION TESTS

1. Elimination Diet ( ND or MD Performs)

An elimination diet can be used to check for food allergies. An elimination diet is one in which foods that may be causing symptoms are removed from the diet for several weeks and then slowly re-introduced one at a time while the person is watched for signs of an allergic reaction.

2. Double Blind Test ( ND or MD Performs)

Another method is the double-blind test. This method involves giving foods and harmless substances in a disguised form. The person being tested and the provider are both unaware of whether the substance tested in that session is the harmless substance or the suspected food. A third party knows the identity of the substances and identifies them with some sort of code.

Disadvantages:

  • This test requires several sessions if more than one substance is under investigation.
  • A risk of anaphylaxis reaction exists

D. PROVOCATION  CHALLENGE TESTS ( MD Performs)

Provocation (challenge) testing involves exposing a person to a suspected allergen under controlled circumstances. This may be done in the diet or by breathing in the suspected allergen. This type of test may provoke severe allergic reactions. Challenge testing should only be done by an MD doctor.

What are the ways to test for intolerances?

The Vega Test Method may be used as the initial screening technique

Advantages: The results available immediately

Disadvantages: False positive or negatives are possible.

Thus the method used at revIvelife™ is the Vega Test Method followed by the traditional Elimination Challenge

What if my intolerances, allergy tests by allergist and or blood allergy tests show different results?

All test methods come with their strengths and weaknesses. Each test result needs to be interpreted with a patient’s health history, tracking of reactions  and record of foods.  The scratch test that your allergist offers does track the histamine response of the most severe allergies which are of an IgE nature that include anaphylaxis.  The limitation of this method is that there are a smaller number of test items and it does not track allergies that are of a delayed nature or IgG reactions. It is estimated that only five percent of food allergies are immediate and ninety-five percent are delayed (Boyles, J.H. Jr., “ Introduction to food allergy: history and characteristics”, In: Krause, H.F., ed., Otolaryngic Allergy and Immunology (Philadelpia: WB Saunders, 1989, 218). Each test method is assessing a different specific reaction. Thus there may be variations in the results.  Blood allergy testing (IgE & IgG) requires consumption of a wide range of foods within 3 weeks of assessment for IgG exposure to be present.  If however a patient is or has had an anaphylaxis reaction for safety reasons it is not possible to reintroduce the offending allergenic food confirmed through previous test methods including scratch testing , it is recommended to overlap all methods of allergy test results and that a false negative may result from IgE and IgG blood testing due to avoidance.  A proper complete evaluation of all food reaction testing will be compiled by your Revivelife™ practitioner and an integrative approach will be recommended.   For a comprehensive approach a new patient visit, lab tests, nutritional consultation and a doctor’s report are recommended.

If I test negative to blood allergy testing but I have had an anaphylactic reaction to the same food before does this mean that I can eat it now?

If you have had an anaphlaxis reaction to a food before the negative blood allergy test DOES NOT mean that you can have it presently.  ( Postgraduate Medicine/Vol 109/No5/May 2001)  Your practitioner with a combined history of your health will help determine the best direction.

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References:

(1) Joint Report of the Royal College of Physicians and the British Nutrition Foundation, (1984). Food intolerance and food aversion. J. Roy. Coll. Phys. Lound. 18:2 (April 1984), 2.
(2) Adverse Reactions to Food. American Academy of Allergy and Immunology Committee on Adverse Reactions to Foods, US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH publication no. 84-2442, July 1984.
(3) Randolph, T.G. and Moss, R.W. Allergies – Your Hidden Enemy, Lippincott & Crowell, New York, 1980 (in UK, Turnstone Press, Wellingborough, 1981).
(4) MacKarness, R., Not All in the Mind. London, 1976
(5) Rapp, Doris J. Allergies and Your Family, Sterling Publishing, New York, 1980
(6) Rapp, Doris J. Allergies and the Hyperactive Child. Cornerstone Library. (Simon & Schuster), New York, 1979.
(7) Buist, Robert. Food Intolerance: What it is and How to Cope With It. Harper & Row, Sydney, Australia, 1984
(8) Breneman, J.C. Basics of Food Allergy. Charles C. Thomas, Springfiels, Illinois, 1978
(9) Lessoff, M.H. (ed) Clinical Reactions to Foods. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 1983, 220pp.
(10)Dickey, L.D. (ed) Clinical Ecology. Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois, 1976

If you have had an anaphlaxis reaction to a food before the negative blood allergy test DOES NOT mean that you can have it presently.  ( Postgraduate Medicine/Vol 109/No5/May 2001)  Your practitioner with a combined history of your health will help determine the best direction.